And Action: Students Audition for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

Students await callbacks for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” following auditions Feb. 4.

Junior+Mattie+Mills+delivers+her+lines+during+auditions+for+the+annual+spring+play+after+school+in+the+music+room+Feb.+4.+This+year%27s+play+will+be+a+1920s-jazz+interpretation+of+William+Shakespeare%27s+%22A+Midsummer+Night%27s+Dream.%22
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And Action: Students Audition for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

Junior Mattie Mills delivers her lines during auditions for the annual spring play after school in the music room Feb. 4. This year's play will be a 1920s-jazz interpretation of William Shakespeare's

Junior Mattie Mills delivers her lines during auditions for the annual spring play after school in the music room Feb. 4. This year's play will be a 1920s-jazz interpretation of William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream."

Avery Brundige

Junior Mattie Mills delivers her lines during auditions for the annual spring play after school in the music room Feb. 4. This year's play will be a 1920s-jazz interpretation of William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream."

Avery Brundige

Avery Brundige

Junior Mattie Mills delivers her lines during auditions for the annual spring play after school in the music room Feb. 4. This year's play will be a 1920s-jazz interpretation of William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream."

Avery Brundige, Features Editor

Avery Brundige
Junior Kyra Wilburn and English teacher Casey Engel converse about Wilburn’s monologue during “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” auditions Feb. 4. The annual spring play will be performed April 17 and 19 at Rockhurst High School’s Rose Theatre.

After the curtains close on the musical, the theater department hosted audtions for the spring play, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” after school in the music room Feb. 4. 

The production of the William Shakespeare play is set to debut April 17 and 18 at Rockhurst High School’s Rose Theater. For auditions, students were encouraged to prepare a short Shakesperian monologue to perform. Students will hear back on director Elizabeth Mulkey’s casting via email. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” will be the first Shakespearian production for junior Mattie Mills. 

“ I’ve never done Shakespeare before so it’s definitely going to be a challenge, but it will be a super fun challenge,” junior Mattie Mills said. “And when it all comes together, it’s going to be a really fun thing to see.”

Avery Brundige
Senior Peyton Wade recites her monologue before the directors during “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” auditions Feb. 4. In preparation for auditions, students were instructed to memorize a monologue, preferably Shakespeare.

Because Shakespeare is often difficult to understand, English teacher Casey Engel is helping out as the cast’s “language coach,” according to Mulkey. Engel’s extensive experience in analyzing and teaching Shakespeare makes her a great asset to the production, according to Mulkey.

“I’m scared to death and super excited all at the same time. I’ve never directed Shakespeare,” Mulkey said. “That’s why we have Ms. Engel for the first time. She’s our language coach so we understand what’s happening.”

Despite the challenge the subject matter poses, senior Maya Bair is eager to begin rehearsal and to see what is in store. However, among an abundance of “firsts,” this will be Bair’s last school production. 

“I am nervous and I am also emotional because it is my last Sion production, Bair said. “However, I am happy to be there and I am excited.”

Avery Brundige
Junior Kathryn Sade, senior Maya Bair, junior Mattie Mills and senior Peyton Wade exchange words of enthusiasm as they practice before auditions for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” Feb. 4. Auditions for the annual Spring Play were held after school in the music room.

The traditional Shakespeare play has a twist with this production. This interpretation of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” will be unique, as it is set in the 1920s and will feature live jazz music played throughout.

“That’s very common with Shakespeare shows,” Mulkey said. “‘What’s your twist, what’s your catch?’ Ours is that we’re putting it in the 1920s and we are adding music.”

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